A Tiny Prick

In the confined space of an 18th century Prisoner's Cell (at the Barbados Museum), the multimedia installation A Tiny Prick probes the metaphorical prison of the postcolonial Creole conscience. In place of the prison cot, pillows with white pillowcases bearing lithographic "portraits" of Creole women (from the Creole Portraits series) are embroidered in white thread with the names of women lost to anonymity on the Caribbean plantation. White female hands in the act of embroidering (in an early 19th century photograph and in a contemporary video projection) juxtaposed with wall text from Toni Morrison's Beloved speak to white shame and accountability and to the indelible stamp of slavery that remains branded on the postcolonial Creole memory.

Entrance to prison cell
Entrance to prison cell

View through opening in door of prison cell at the Barbados Museum, Bridgetown, Barbados

A Tiny Prick (detail)
A Tiny Prick (detail)

multimedia installation in the prison cell at the Barbados Museum, 2004

A Tiny Prick (detail)
A Tiny Prick (detail)

multimedia installation in the prison cell at the Barbados Museum, 2004

A Tiny Prick (detail)
A Tiny Prick (detail)

multimedia installation in the prison cell at the Barbados Museum, 2004

A Tiny Prick (detail)
A Tiny Prick (detail)

detail of photograph from Jamaica showing a group of women embroidering on a verandah